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Residency Artists

Karolina Ptaszkowska

Karolina lives and works in Bristol, but was born in Nowy Sacz (Poland). She gained her MA from The Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw in 2010 and in recent years, she was enrolled on the Turps Art School Correspondence Course.

Karolina works across painting and installation and articulates poetic, inter-subjective dialogues. It results from myriad sources: psychoanalysis, linguistics, the mundane as well as art history and pop culture.

Karolina’s works mirror painterly sensitivity defined by vitality, drama and sign-tracing. She highlights the physicality and psychology of the painterly gesture. She asks a question if the image has a body, and if yes – is it a social, a physical or a psychological one. Ptaszkowska addresses these aspects in various layers of her practice.

Website: http://www.karolinaptaszkowska.com

I spent three months working at the Garage towards my (postponed) solo show with a gallery based in Warsaw (Pl). Time at the residency aligned with the national lockdown, and the cycling to the Garage became my window on the world.

I have a home-based-studio and work in isolation, therefore I appreciated regular friendly chats with the host (first month only through the window glass), as well as other studio visits, that initiated longer discussions about methods, and ideas behind the art; and led to new social connections.

I was able to comfortably immerse myself in the work, experimenting with a scale, different structures and textiles for my paintings, as well as non-linear narratives. Being able to focus on a few pieces at the same time, as well as a prolonged time-frame for my thought and material processes resulted in a more consistent approach to the overall picture for my art and future possibilities.

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Residency Artists

Martyn Cross

photo credit: Irina & Silviu

“My studio practice is primarily painting led but I also work with sculptural forms, interventions and installation. The works usually depict beings in ponderous poses and transcendental states, their personal possessions charged with human characteristics. Taking inspiration from the artwork and artifacts of ancient civilizations, together with signifiers of contemporary living, I try to describe a world that slips between the cracks; something that is equal parts frightening, funny and falling apart.”

The time I spent at the Garage was a pause in my regular studio practice and a chance to pull together some rogue elements that had been knocking around my head for some time. Having the space to spread out and play was a welcome break from the tiny and overcrowded workspace that I normally call home. It was an opportunity to throw some daft shapes and not worry what the outcome was going to be; it felt like I was dancing and nobody was watching.

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